Leased but Not Producing

Leaving but Not Producing is the term given to the property which has been taken on lease by any organization, government or private or individual, but the land is not used for any purpose. It is just left like a barren piece of land. Leased but not producing is a general category in the case…

Leaving but Not Producing is the term given to the property which has been taken on lease by any organization, government or private or individual, but the land is not used for any purpose. It is just left like a barren piece of land. Leased but not producing is a general category in the case of Oil and Natural Gas. Government Organizations all over the world take land on lease from where Oil and Natural Gas can be extracted. The main motto of Lease but not producing is to save the resources for future. The Leased land which is not producing serves two purposes at the same time. It helps in saving the resources for future and also provides stability to the economy of a country during bad times of global economy known as recession. Oil and Natural Gas in near future will be able to give a boost to any country's economy singlehandedly and the countries with resources of the same will be the superpowers.

The Government of United States of America has leased land over various parts of the country where oil and natural gas has been found but those areas are declared as non-producing as those regions are America's future prospect. According to a survey conducted, it was found that more than half of the leases of Federal Oil and Natural Gas lease come under the category of Lease but not Producing.

Out of a total of 46000 Oil and Natural Gas leases, 25000 are the Lease but not Working Category. The Government of United States has leased over thirty seven million acres of land but the land comes under category of not producing. The Government has leased about 40% of the total Oil and Natural Gas producing land in the country and is planning to acquire 60 per cent of the Oil and Natural Gas producing land by the end of 2018.

Apart from Oil and Natural Gas, the concept of leased but not producing does not hold much of a significance. Governments have come up with the idea of ​​leased but not producing to overcome the oil crisis in future and to have a stable economy even during the times of economic breakdowns. Oil and Natural Gas are thought to be the safest investment in today's economy.

There are disadvantages of this system too: The land leased by government which falls under the non-producing category gets wasted and become barren. This policy of Leased but not producing has also raised many eyeballs. Various Non Government Organizations all over the world are appealing to their respective Governments to release the leased land which will not be immediately used so that it can be used for some useful purpose which can be used in the development of the country. This fight between Government Organizations and NGO's have entered the legal arena and NGO's are asking the court to order to stop Government encroachment and make the leased land useful for some productive work. It is at final stages.

How to Seal the Deal for Lease Proposals

There are many mineral owners, who due to the lack of complete understanding of the leasing laws while entering into the contract are not able to yield maximum benefits of mineral interests. Mineral owners must not be lured in by only the attractiveness of the contract and must be fully aware of the Lease proposals.…

There are many mineral owners, who due to the lack of complete understanding of the leasing laws while entering into the contract are not able to yield maximum benefits of mineral interests. Mineral owners must not be lured in by only the attractiveness of the contract and must be fully aware of the Lease proposals. A better understanding of the proposals will not only guard them against any type of wrong doings but also would ensure that they can maximize the impact of the deal they are getting into.

The most common and most misunderstood clause when it comes to the Lease proposals is the Pugh Clause. The common mistake many owners commit is to feel secured due to the presence of Pugh Clause. But the fact is the Pugh clause may or may not be able to provide the protection to the owners, as there is no specific definition of this clause. It can be used in alternate ways; therefore it is good to have this clause with you but to depend upon it entirely would not be a good idea. The most important thing that must always be kept in mind while making Lease Proposals is to ensure that the proper identity of the person who is in contact and who has been contacted is fairly and properly established. There should only be one person from the family who should interact with the oil company, and there must not be any discrepancy in the statement. There should be clarity in the deal, and at times the owners are contacted by middlemen, agents, supervisors or may be directly by the entrepreneurs, since proper understanding of who is saying, what they are saying, must always be very clear to avoid any later conflicts of communication.

Proper investigation about the company or the owners that have contacted must be done before signing the Lease Proposals. Appropriate fine framed, legal paper work must be prepared, properly read and must be signed by both the parties to enter the deal. At times neglect in small basic things like paper work, or proper inquiry can have major implications and can even result in heavy losses; therefore it is important to be careful at the start to reap the benefits later.

At times people just tend to go with the price, their prime focus is entirely based on the mathematical calculations of what they will be receiving, and this can many times lead to unsatisfied transactions. Therefore, all the documents must be carefully studied, all the points involved must be fully understood, and if necessary an expert or an experienced person can be contacted. Remember your satisfaction before signing Lease Proposals is the key, since if you are not interested, you must not force yourself for any kind of agreement under any circumstances. Make sure that you do not warrant your mineral titles, you have full right not to sign them and also discard them completely if you are not interested. Lease Proposals if carefully processed can yield great benefits, therefore always ensure that you do not hurry with signing the deal.

3 Tips on Getting Your Security Deposit Refunded

First Tip – Make sure that the lease has a written description that explains what has to happen to receive a full refund of your security deposit. If not, than ask the landlord to type out a description of what is required to get a 100% refund. For instance, can you rent a rug doctor…

First Tip – Make sure that the lease has a written description that explains what has to happen to receive a full refund of your security deposit. If not, than ask the landlord to type out a description of what is required to get a 100% refund. For instance, can you rent a rug doctor and steam clean your apartment, or do you have to hire a professional carpet cleaning company, or the company that they use? Can you paint the rooms or do you have to hire a professional to paint the apartment? Can you repair and nail holes you made to hang pictures or do you have to hire a professional company to make the repairs? Do not accept a verbal agreement from the landlord, it has to be in a document that both of you sign and date to protect both parties.

Second Tip – Now that you are ready for a walk through the apartment in order for you take possession of the unit. Make sure you have your digital camera with you, extra batteries, and an extra tape or flash card. With your digital camera make sure to look at all walls, ceilings, flooring, and appliances in the unit. Let's start with the walls, if there is a mark, a hole, faded paint, or dirt on the wall make sure that you have a good picture of the area and the room it was in and see if they are going to repair those issues before your move in date and if not make sure you have a detail list and pictures of how the place looked before you moved in. Make sure on the ceilings that there is no water stains, holes, or marks on them. Whether the floor has carpeting, wood, tile, or vinyl, make sure there are no spots, tears, holes, or discoloration on them. On the appliances, sinks, stools, and tubs or showers that there are no scratches, rust spots, dents, or cracks. If there is anything that has a problem in that apartment make sure to get more than one picture of each issue and make sure that the person who is doing the walk through with you writes down exactly what each item is and that on the document it states that you are not be responsible for the items listed on the document, then make sure that both of you sign and date the document.

Third Tip – Make sure that you pay your rent before the due date or on the due date, that you put your trash into the proper disposal place and any holes, marks, dirt or stains that you made while you were living there are repaired before you do a walk through when you are ready to move. Be kind to your landlord on the phone or in person, kindness goes a long way in negations. Make sure to keep good records of when you made a call to the landlord to get something fixed. Your records should include date, time, who you spoke to, description of the problem, when they were going to look at the problem, who looked at the problem, date and time problem was fixed, and was it to your satisfaction. If all fails hire an Attorney.

Understanding Your Lease As a Tenant

Most of the problems between a renter and a landlord is the lack of communicating with each other and allowing everything said to become personal. Main thing that a landlord is looking for in a renter is someone who will pay their rent on time, will not destroy their property, put your garbage into the…

Most of the problems between a renter and a landlord is the lack of communicating with each other and allowing everything said to become personal. Main thing that a landlord is looking for in a renter is someone who will pay their rent on time, will not destroy their property, put your garbage into the proper disposal place, and not to have extra people living in your house that is not on the lease, so remember to abide by those simple rules than when you need your landlord to fix or help you with something you will have their attention.

I think one of the most important things that a renter should be aware of is the Lease. Make for sure that when you are signing a lease that you have read it word for word and that if you do not understand what it means to have the person in charge of having you sign the lease explain it to you and if you do not think what you read and what they explained to you is accurate, than hire an attorney to explain what the lease is requiring you to do. If renter's would take that extra time in the beginning to have someone explain what they are agreeing to in the lease it would make life easier for both parties involved. Also remember if there is anything you do not like in the lease or you think something else should be added to the lease then go back to the landlord before signing with the changes and see if they will agree to the new changes in the lease, like:

Who is responsible for paying the electricity, gas, and water bill?
Who is going to do the repairs and cleaning?
Can you have a pet and do you get the security deposit back on a pet?
How much is the fee for late payments?
Who is going to mow the yard, trim the bushes, and remove the snow?

Normally this process will get you and the landlord a chance to communicate about what concerns you have, and they will gain them some information about your concerns and desires of being their tenant. Remember that when you sign a lease it is a binding contract between you and the landlord and you can not say in court that you did not understand what you were signing, so please make sure that you understand the lease before signing the lease.

If you are an active-duty member of any of the armed forces you can end your lease in 15 day period if:

You were ordered to live in a government-supplied facility.
You were discharged or released from active duty.
You receive temporary duty orders to a station at least 25 miles away for 90 days or more.
You received permanent change of station.

If any of the above conditions happened, then you are entitled to a full refund of the security deposit if other lease provisions have been met. If you are in the military be sure to read up on the Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Long-Term Vs Short-Term Leasing

Companies who want to lease industrial spaces must consider the long term and short term effect to their business. Usually, companies look for industrial space for rent to serve as warehouse to their goods and other products. Some rent industrial spaces to serve as manufacturing plants and production area. Neverheless, these should be considered prior…

Companies who want to lease industrial spaces must consider the long term and short term effect to their business. Usually, companies look for industrial space for rent to serve as warehouse to their goods and other products. Some rent industrial spaces to serve as manufacturing plants and production area. Neverheless, these should be considered prior to renting. A long-term lease is bounded by an agreement that will last from five to 20 years. Short term lease agreement can last five years or even less. Consumers should be fully aware about their advantages and disadvantages before making any decision.

Advantages of Long-Term Leases

• Fewer Price Increase for Long-Term Leases. Lessees should not worry about paying fabulous amounts of money for frequent rent increase. Long-term clients enjoy the same rate as they had when they first entered into contract. However, this does mean that long-term leases are cheaper. Lessees do not have to worry about price increases as compared to short-term leasing. Most clients who want to lease an industrial space are also given discounts depending on the planned duration of stay and use.

• Better Relationship Built through Long-Term Leases. Long-term leases are necessary to build better relationships between building owner and clients. Those businesses that are frequently moving from one place to another do not build a good relationship with the owner and the community itself. Further, long-term leases are able to establish their name and brand within the area where they are set. This will also give them access to the location where they are set.

• Saved Time Looking for Industrial Spaces. Long-term agreements will help business owners save a lot of time looking for a place to transfer upon near the end of their contracts.

Disadvantages of Long-Term Leases

• Less Flexibility. Long-term leases lock clients to an agreement that can not be ended right away. Some business owners see this as a problem whenever an economic downturn takes place. This will result in moving to a cheaper location. However, they will have to pay fines in-case this happens. Some industrial spaces allow a breakout clause in their contracts. This will also allow clients to terminate their contract engagement provided that the landlord sees a reasonable excuse. Neverheless, this is still very rare to find.

Another difficulty deal with long-term lease is that expansion can be held back. This is because a business can not expand right away and add more workers if the space they have are limited. They will have to pay certain fines to terminate their existing contract in the event that they are to transfer to a larger location. They will also be reprimanded to change any structure within the leased building to cater to their growing needs. Tenants that will lease additional space will also need additional money to pay for it. Instead of gaining, they will spend even more. That is why experts advise business owners to research what type of business will be successful in the location where the leased industrial space is located. This is essential prior to signing any deal. This will also allow them to determine if they need long-term or short-term industrial space for their business.

• More Expensive Costs. Leasing industrial spaces proves to be more expensive than the cost to own a building. However, business owners who have scarcity of cash to fund building construction will be owed to leasing. The expenses incurred during the leasing period will include property rent, fees for services, occupancy costs and maintenance and business rates. Tenants do not also have the right to claim the industrial spaces as their own even when they use it as their own. This is a great disadvantage if they happen to be paying a 20-year contract.

Advantages of Short-Term Leases

Easy To Move Out. Business owners can have an easier time to move out and look for new industrial spaces in the event that they want to expand their business venture. A thriving business can always have their contracts renewed or move out to a larger area. On the other hand, if these businesses do not succeed, tenants can easily move out and relocate to a better business area.
Disadvantage of Short-Term Leases

• Frequent Rent Increase. Landlords can have the rents increased once a year or even once every six months. This is a big disadvantage to tenants especially when they are only starting their venture in the business industry.

• High Turnover. Shorter lease contracts can result in higher turnover rates. This is because tenants can be less concerned to the spaces they are renting. They can also relocate to other places or buildings as they wish. This can affect the growth of a budding business or cause it to ever fall.

• Vacancies Affect Business. Buildings that are unoccupied can result in break-ins and vandalism. Short-term renters that want to make use of an unoccupied building will have to wait longer until it gets fixed. Otherwise, they will have to fix it themselves and ask for reimbursements from the monthly rents they have to pay.

• Lost Income. Short-term leases can allow renters to stay five years or less. This can cause a lot of hassle especially when the duration is about or already finished. They will also need to find a location prior to the deadline. This can affect the income that the business may generate. Owners may also lose a lot of money for application fees and waste time looking for the right building to lease. Other fees such as taxes and mortgage are still paid even when they are already looking for a new place to transfer. This results to short-term leases being not the most cost-effective solutions for a budding business.

There are few laws that must be considered prior to signing a deal for industrial space for rent. This will include the authority of landlords to charge as much as they want for security deposit. Further, there are no stipulated laws to protect the tenants' privacy. Therefore, business owners must be aware of this prior to signing and engaging to a leasing contract. Business owners should also understand that there are no standard forms when it comes to commercial leasing. Landlords can even draft a customized solution that can be offered to prospective tenants.

Each of these clauses drafted by landlords is different. That is why these need to be examined by tenants to determine how these will affect the business. Industrial spaces can also be negotiated a lot easier compared to residential areas. Business owners can always negotiate for the best price before signing a deal. Business leases can be negotiated more easily than residential leases.

Rent Out A Room During The 2012 Olympic Games

Many people will certainly be looking to rent out a room this coming summer in Stratford, London, United Kingdom. The Olympic Games 2012 is ringing all over the world. Everyone is excited and wanting to be in the exact place to witness the grand event. Aside from the fanatics of the event, relatives, friends, politicians…

Many people will certainly be looking to rent out a room this coming summer in Stratford, London, United Kingdom. The Olympic Games 2012 is ringing all over the world. Everyone is excited and wanting to be in the exact place to witness the grand event. Aside from the fanatics of the event, relatives, friends, politicians and other citizens of every country participant will certainly be present in London, too.

Estimate the number of people before you rent out a room
Those people may have relatives to stay in Stratford but many are expected to be renting. Thus, residents want a room that is intended for their family's size. If you are alone visiting in Stratford, better rent a room only than renting a whole apartment or a house. But if you want privacy and have a means of paying so, a pad or a whole house would always be better. Whatever you come to rent, always, make sure of your safety because landlords have many properties to rent. They rent out a room, a pad or a house.

How to rent out a room?
Taking advantage of this opportunity, of the coming Olympics is never wrong. Opportunities like this happen rare. Think smart and make some money. Think of an effective business. If you have a vacant space in your home or a room, you can rent out a room or rent out a sofa. You may also choose to vacate that room for a couple of weeks, just good for the Olympic Games duration or as long as you need the money. This opportunity comes rare. Decorate and clean it. Aside from the fact that you earn money, you can help those that are in need of a place to stay even just for a night.

Different ways to rent out your room
One way of letting people know that you are renting out your property, try to advertise it. You can advertise by printing poster, in the newspaper, in the radio, television or in the internet. Whatever ways you have come to use, just make sure that you will not let just any stranger to get inside your house since people that have heard your advertisement may come to see your property in person.

Those strangers may become our tenants but it is always better to consider who those strangers really are. Whoever will be your tenant, make sure to discuss the tenancy agreement for it will create mutual understanding.

Getting Out of an Apartment Lease Early

I consider myself a professional mover, and not in the sense that I move other people's belongings between homes. In the last twenty years, I have moved around more times than I care to admit, and in some cases the exit was rather abrupt. If you are currently renting an apartment and need to vacate,…

I consider myself a professional mover, and not in the sense that I move other people's belongings between homes. In the last twenty years, I have moved around more times than I care to admit, and in some cases the exit was rather abrupt. If you are currently renting an apartment and need to vacate, you may feel at a loss because you are locked into a lease. Is it possible to get out of your lease early without having to pay it off? You'll definitely need the money to help with moving expenses and rent / mortgage elsewhere, so what do you do?

First, you need to determine if a move midway through your lease is necessary:

1) You have been transferred to another city or state. If you are in the military and sent to another base, you may find assistance through the government in helping you move. If you are moving for work-related reasons, you may wish to connect with someone in Human Resource to see if they offer assistance.

2) Living conditions have dramatically worsened. When you first moved in you may not have encountered problems, but over time you might have discovered an uptick in crime in the area, or neighbors have moved in that make noise all hours of the nights. In my experience as a renter, I've had to deal with neighbors who blasted their stereos at 1AM, and neighbors who smoked in a leaky building. Some problems are easily resolved, but in the case of the smoking we did have to leave an apartment early for health reasons.

3) The building's condition is poor. Sometimes the ventilation does not work, or paint is chipping all around you and the landlord is slow to respond to your requests. If you feel the place is about to fall down around you, you may be inclined to leave early.

If you believe you have just reason to break your lease without incurring any penalty, you should contact someone who knows the laws in your area. Find your lease and determine if there's anything useful to help you. In certain cases, your landlord may be willing to work with you if your move is connected to your job, otherwise you could be in for legal tussle.

What's important in this situation is that you remain calm and try not to stress over money. Acting agitated and defensive may not help your situation with a landlord, but if you have a good reason to break your lease have the legal ground to back you up.

Things a Renter Should Know

The family or individual who is thinking about the advantages of leasing or renting should make a catalog of education to prepare themselves for the world of apartments, condominiums, townhouses, and duplexes. Money Questions How much is rent a month? What does this include? (Water, Electricity, Gas, Cable, Internet, Lawn care, Snow removal) How much…

The family or individual who is thinking about the advantages of leasing or renting should make a catalog of education to prepare themselves for the world of apartments, condominiums, townhouses, and duplexes.

Money Questions

  1. How much is rent a month? What does this include? (Water, Electricity, Gas, Cable, Internet, Lawn care, Snow removal)
  2. How much is the deposit? If I change my mind before I sign the lease do I get my deposit back? Is there a fee to process the paper work? How do I get my deposit back when I move out?
  3. Do you have a list of the fees that will be charged to the deposit when I move out if it has not been taken care of?
  4. How much is the application fee? Is the application fee per person or per couple?

About The lease

  1. How long are your lease terms?
  2. When your lease is up do you have to sign another lease or does it turn into a month to month rent?
  3. What is the penalty if I break the lease?
  4. Can I have a copy of the lease to look at before I make any decisions?
  5. Do you allow pets? What kind of pets do you allow? Is there a weight or breed restriction? How many pets can you have? Is there a pet deposit? Do you get the deposit back at the end of the lease? What would be a reason as to why I would not get the pet deposit back? Where is this in the lease? Is there a monthly pet rent?
  6. What Amenities are Included in the Rent and who has access to these amenities. Swiming pool? Is there a limitation as to who can come to the pool with me? Hot Tub? Club house? Do you pay more if you want to reserve the Club House? Movie theater? Tennis court? Basket ball court? Work out room? Is it open 24 hours?

Maintenance

  1. If there is a maintenance issue when will this be resolved?
  2. Do you always have a maintenance individual on call 24/7?
  3. What is your policy on employees of the property entering the apartment?
  4. Can you enter at anytime without notice?
  5. How long of a notice is given before you enter the residence?
  6. Have you had an issue with pest control?
  7. How often do you spray for pest in the apartments?
  8. If I am having a pest issue will you spray at my request?

About the unit you are renting

  1. How many bedrooms and bathrooms?
  2. What is the square footage the apartment?
  3. How big is each room?
  4. Do you have a layout of the apartment that I can view?
  5. Do you have pictures of the apartment?
  6. What is included in the kitchen? (microwave, dishwasher, double sink / single sink, garbage disposal, oven, Does the refrigerator have an icemaker)
  7. Is there a washer and dryer included, if so; is it a side by side standard size washer and dryer or is in a mini stackable washer and dryer? Is there a washer and dryer hook up? Does it fit a standard washer and dryer side by side?
  8. Are there ceiling fans? Which rooms?
  9. What is the flooring in the apartment?
  10. Has it been changed recently?
  11. Carpet was professionally cleaned after the previous residents moved out?
  12. Does the bathroom have a shower, bathtub, or a shower / bathtub combination?
  13. Is there a balcony or porch?
  14. Can you grill out on the balcony or porch? Do you allow gas grills or caracole grills?
  15. Is it a smoke free unit?
  16. What can I do if I am not happy with the condition of the apartment?

Once I have found where I would like to live and getting ready to put down a deposit or sign a lease I make sure these questions are answered and these steps are done on my end. When I am shown the apartment I want to lease they will always show me nice, show apartment, is this the exact apartment I am going to move into, if not; I will not put anything down or sign a paper until I see the one I am going to move into. The first apartment I moved into I was shown the “show apartment” and was told that the apartment I will move into will be the same. Yeah it was the same set up but my apartment had 100's cockroaches, was dirty, and the condition was nothing I expected. Verify that everything you were promised is in the lease and if not have them write it down and sign and date next to it. Take tons of pictures of the apartment / rental property during the walk through and give them a copy. Have them sign that they received the copy. I have processed the CD with all of the picture via certified mail to make sure I have a date and a signature of when they received the package. This may seem like a ton of questions. But in the long run it is worth the time and energy I put in when finding a place to rent because I am never unpleasantly surprised because I have dotted my i's and cross all my t's.

How to Effectively Market an Apartment to Potential Renters

Most apartment managers are pretty closed minded about advertising opportunities, and do little, or nothing to promote their apartment community. So, with this mentality, how will a prospective renter perform an apartment search to find your community? Chances are, he / she will not ever find your community unless they get in the car, drive…

Most apartment managers are pretty closed minded about advertising opportunities, and do little, or nothing to promote their apartment community. So, with this mentality, how will a prospective renter perform an apartment search to find your community? Chances are, he / she will not ever find your community unless they get in the car, drive around, and stumble upon your community by accident. As a landlord, or a management company, there are certain places to advertise, and specific websites to market your community on to gain the best exposure, and to increase your opportunities for renting your apartments for rent.

Craigslist is a free website to post and publish apartment listings. Yes, there are some paid aspects of Craigslist, such as the job postings, but currently apartment listings are free. A large number of online apartment hunters are searching for apartments on Craigslist, and will definitely find you if you've taken a few minutes to post your available apartment for rent on their website. Craigslist is great because landlords can actually post the specific apartment that is available so when prospects come across it, they already know everything they need to about that particular apartment.

Next, you need to make sure you're listing your community on all of the leading apartment search engines. Each of the major apartment search websites offer general apartment community listings to large multi-family properties. Because each of these websites collectively receive many millions of monthly visitors, the odds of someone coming across your community get significantly better being listed on the above mentioned sites.

Also, when you list online with most of these websites, they also put your apartment community advertisement in a rental magazine that gets circulated to a large number of grocery stores, and gets seen by a large number of potential renters. This can dramatically increase your exposure, and great news, is usually free with your online listing!

Do not hire a human directional sign person to stand out front with your community name printed on a large sign. These are costly methods of advertising, and are not likely to attract prospects. Do not put large banners on the walls of your apartment buildings hiring to attract the eyes of drive-by prospects because there are certain codes and regulations attached to this and only new apartment communities can get away with it for a period of time. The last thing you need is a fine, which could result from this type of advertising.

I hope that this has helped you determine the best places to advertise your community to get the best exposure to rent your apartments. Following these methods should ensure your success as a landlord or apartment management company.

How to Perform a Background Check on a Potential Apartment Tenant

In the old days, apartment renting was based on trust, and often times a handshake by the community manager and the prospective renter. These days, it's tough to get away with the same approach when screening tenants to rent apartments due to a variety of reasons. Tenants are not paying their rent on-time, partying too…

In the old days, apartment renting was based on trust, and often times a handshake by the community manager and the prospective renter. These days, it's tough to get away with the same approach when screening tenants to rent apartments due to a variety of reasons. Tenants are not paying their rent on-time, partying too late, or breaking an assortment of other rules that are grounds for eviction. The trick is to use a screening process that weeds out the potential bad renters, and keep only the good ones to move into your apartments.

One of the best approaches is to use a property management software such as Onesite or Yardi to do this for you. Yes, I said, “do this for you.” All an apartment manager has to do is have the potential renter fill out a leasing application and sign at the bottom. Then, the apartment manager is able to plug in the prospect's information into the software program like Onesite, or Yardi, and the computer program will generate an almost instantaneous response that tells the manager to either approve, conditions with conditions, or deny the prospect from moving in. This process can take a matter of seconds to completely perform. These programs will take the information that a renter puts on their application, and tell the manager whether that person is a potential risk to rent to. While this does solve the larger problem of how likely that person is to pay their rent on-time, what about whether they'll cause any problems such as noise distortions or breaking other rules of some kind?

The best approach to see if a potential renter will be a nuisance on your property is to call the references that they listed on their application. The references should be able to answer basic questions and not cause any fair housing issues. You should be able to ask when the renter occupied the apartment, and often short occupancy dates would mean that they had a problem at their last place. Also, you can ask whether or not the last apartment community would rent to them again. If they say “yes,” then it's not likely you'll have a problem with them either.

Using these two approaches concurrently will dramatically reduce your chances for renting to a terrible renter, and increase your chances of success. I would encourage an apartment manager to thoroughly check out references before renting to a person.

How to Bring Up Uncomfortable Issues With Your Landlord

Your landlord should be a resource for you to vent, let out your concerns, or talk about anything that is bothering you about your stay at any particular apartment community. How do you bring up uncomfortable things to your landlord to ensure that you're not opening up a can of worms with your neighbors or…

Your landlord should be a resource for you to vent, let out your concerns, or talk about anything that is bothering you about your stay at any particular apartment community. How do you bring up uncomfortable things to your landlord to ensure that you're not opening up a can of worms with your neighbors or management team?

Some of the common situations you'll be involved in as a renter are as follows, and I've also outlined some of the common ways to handle these situations with your landlord:

-When your upstairs neighbors are stomping around, or making too much noise too early, or too late in the day.
-When there are skateboarding kids outside your apartment making lots of noise and also endangering their lives with cars speeding by.
-The dog next door is barking constantly and you know it's not on the lease.

Each of these situations are uncomfortable to bring up with your landlord, but each of these situations need toought up to be corrected. If you do not bring any of them up with your landlord, there will not be anything done to accommodate you, or your needs.

The absolute best approach to any uncomfortable situation is to write your landlord a letter. The beginning of your letter should start out saying something like “I enjoy living here,” or, “I've loved the time that I've spent at this community that far, but …” This gives the landlord the initial impression that you're not just some person that complains about everything, and it also lets the landlord know subconsciously that they are doing an excellent job managing the community. Then, you need to be very clear about what your problem is. You must not explain in your letter how to correct the issue, because that will overstep the manager's toes and could cause you future problems with that landlord if you need their help again. Letting the manager solve the issue in their own way is crucial to helping you solve the issues that exist. Your letter will be filed away in your personal resident file, and you will have a record of your complaint if needed for future problems with the same neighbors.

Now, you may be concerned that the landlord may mention you and this could cause an uncomfortable environment between you and your problem neighbor. You should rest easy knowing that your relationship with your landlord is private just as the doctor / patient relationship. You will not have to worry about being retaliated against just because you had an issue.

During your initial apartment search, look up reviews online and make sure the landlord is not brushing off concern, and is actually handling them appropriately, because you just never know when one landlord is not following the rules appropriatively.

How To Terminate Your Lease Agreement And Not Hurt Your Credit

Apartment management companies place places in your lease agreement that protect you against certain situations that require you to break your lease … Typically, these clauses protect the rental property more-so than the renter, but soon, these clauses can protect you, and your credit, in the event that you need to break you lease and…

Apartment management companies place places in your lease agreement that protect you against certain situations that require you to break your lease … Typically, these clauses protect the rental property more-so than the renter, but soon, these clauses can protect you, and your credit, in the event that you need to break you lease and move from the community.

Most apartment communities put a clause in the lease agreement that allows active military personnel the right to terminate their lease provided they can show documentation to prove they're being shipped somewhere not within the local area their apartment is in. A normal lease agreement may stipulate that the renter still pay an additional 30 days of rent to accompaniment a 30 day notice period, but you will then be able to leave the apartment community without damaging your credit.

Many apartment communities offer a lease-break fee as an option to get out of your lease early without hurting your credit. In many situations, a lease-break fee is equivalent to one month's rent, and is paid at the time you break your lease. You would pay the lease-break fee, along with an additional 30 day notice (and rent owed for those 30 days) at the time you give your notice to move. The only catch is that if you received any additional specials when you moved in, a lot of apartment communities will require that you pay those back since you did not fulfill your full lease, but this will save you from a hurtful ding on your credit score.

During this economic recession, many apartment communities are putting addendum's into their lease agreement that state, “if you lose your job while living in our community, you can break your lease and move without paying your lease-break fee.” This means that if you can provide proof that you were laid off from your job while living in the apartment community, the manager will waive your lease-break fee and let you move provided you still give a 30 written notice to vacate and pay rent for those 30 days. If the lease-break fee is one month's rent, that's certainly a deal and should not be charged about by any renter. The only catch is that you must be let go due to economic reasons and not fired from the job, or quit the job on your own.

These are merely ideas to help you understand certain situations where you can move out of an apartment community early, and avoid any negative ding on your credit score. Of course, each community you move to will differ, this will be a good starting point for any potential renter.

How to Choose Rentals From Out-Of-State

Finding rentals when you are out of town is not as easy as it may seem. For those who are relocating to an area for a job or for other reasons, it is critical to work with the right professionals to help you through the process. This means working with professionals who know the area…

Finding rentals when you are out of town is not as easy as it may seem. For those who are relocating to an area for a job or for other reasons, it is critical to work with the right professionals to help you through the process. This means working with professionals who know the area well and can help you to not only find the right size and structure for your needs but also the right neighborhood for your family. Before you make a decision to invest in any property, know as much as you can about it and find out if it fits your needs properly.

What to Look for in Property

When it comes to rentals, they are not all the same. It is very easy to see pictures online of various properties and then to think that the location you selected is the best one for you. However there is more to think about than just the way the location looks online. Here are some tips to help you to know if that property really is a good investment for your needs.

– Look at the room sizes carefully. Often times, pictures do not provide enough information. Use the room size to help you to gauge the amount of space you have. Measure the rooms you have now for comparison.

– Learn as much as you can about the neighborhood. This means comparing things like the schools, shopping areas and the overall amenities offered. This is even more important if you have children or pets that need special needs.

– Find out what amenities may be available to you within the facility and whether or not those fit your needs. For example, you may want a larger outdoor area. You may want to have plenty of sunshine streaming in the windows. You may be after a specific style, such as a ranch or colonial, or just an apartment.

The more information you have about the location, the easier it will be for you to choose the location that is right for your needs. To do this, look for an agent in the area that can help you to pinpoint available properties that may meet your needs. Budget factors are almost always a concern, but they do not have to limit you in most cases.

When it comes to finding rentals, it often takes time to determine which property is going to be right for you. Yet, when you are doing this from a distance, you need to be able to put trust in the professionals you are working with to know that they are giving you the best possible opportunity to locate an area right for your needs.

Step by Step Guide in Letting Your Property

Letting your property can be a daunting experience but knowing the process can help put at ease a lot of those fears. Using a letting agent can help with every stage of letting your property from valuation, to views, comprehensively referencing tenants and providing a Full Property Management service, if desired. Step 1. Accurate Valuation…

Letting your property can be a daunting experience but knowing the process can help put at ease a lot of those fears. Using a letting agent can help with every stage of letting your property from valuation, to views, comprehensively referencing tenants and providing a Full Property Management service, if desired.

Step 1. Accurate Valuation

Having an empty property can cause a great deal of stress and reduce your yields. Every agent's focus must be to let your property in the shortest period of time at the highest possible price, without over pricing your property which will also cause void periods. Therefore getting an accurate and realistic valuation is, therefore, very important.

It's always a good idea to: –

  • Do your research
  • Get the agents to justify their valuation
  • Consider how much do you need to cover your mortgage, any ground rent and or service charges, and the agency fees.

Step 2 Kerb Appeal

As with selling a property the condition and presentation of your property is vitally important, especially if there are similar types of property to rent also available. Remember that tenants are normally looking for the similar types of things in a rental property as if they were going to buy this will be their home and most are looking for something that is clean, tidy, well decorated and well maintained. Most prospective decisions decide within the first few minutes of walking into a property if it's right for them.

Step 3 Selecting an Agent and Service

Selecting an Agent to let your property can in itself be a minefield with so many agents out there. The most important thing to remember is to go with an agent you believe you can trust as they will be looking after and caring for your property and also one that you can also get along with and who has time for you to find out your individual needs as a Landlord.

Deciding on which service to opt for again is something that can be difficult, this will come down to what time and knowledge you have and your location. Letting your property can be very time consuming and with everyone having busy lives, trying to sort out a plumber on a Sunday morning is not everyone's idea of ​​fun especially if you live 100 miles away, in this case a Full Property Management Service would be the best service with all the hassle taken away and someone else dealing with those problems. If you are close to your rental property and have the knowledge of the Legal Legislation (and also the time), then maybe a Tenant Find Service is more suitable.

A good letting agent should be able to tailor packages to suit your individual needs.

Step 4 Marketing

To find the perfect tenant you need to give your property maximum exposure, thus ensuring that your property is advertised on all the major property website portals. At this stage you will also need to have an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) in place.

Step 5 Viewing and Offers

Once your property is markedly hopeful the prospective tenants will come flooding in and viewings will acknowledge which will either be carried out by the Agents or yourself if desired. When an offer is made to rent your property your agent will inform you of the rent offered and details of the prospective tenants. If you are then happy to proceed Full Referencing will then be carried out on the prospective contracts.

Step 6 Preparing the property for move in

When the checks are being carried out now is the time to ensure that the following is ready: –

  • Gas Safety Certificate
  • PAT Test – All electrical appliances have to be tested to be safe
  • Ensure the property is clean
  • Inventory and Condition Report to be compiled – Without this you could be powerless to deduct any monies at the end of the tenancy if there was a dispute
  • Take meter reading, which should be carried out at the same time as the inventory
  • Ensure instructions booklets for appliances are available

Step 7 Move in

Once the tenants check have come back and all required Legal requirements have been met then the tenants can move into the property. Your agent will draw up an Assured Shorthold Tenancy for either 6 / 12months, which is agreed, and all other necessary documentation. They will also take one months rent in advance and damage deposit. The damage deposit will then need to be held within a Government based scheme, of which there are 3 to choose from. The aim of a professional letting agent is to make life as simple as possible for Landlords be they Fully Managed or Let Only and to ensure their property is maintained and cared for.

Software Used to Effectively and Efficiently Screen Potential Tenants

Running a background check used to require a landlord to do a lot of the legwork. Calling around, making inquiries to the banking institution, and a variety of other tedious tasks to ensure your potential future tenant will pay their rent on time and allow other tenants to enjoy their apartments without any nuisances. These…

Running a background check used to require a landlord to do a lot of the legwork. Calling around, making inquiries to the banking institution, and a variety of other tedious tasks to ensure your potential future tenant will pay their rent on time and allow other tenants to enjoy their apartments without any nuisances. These days are behind us, and performing a background check prior to your tenant moving in is getting easier, and easier.

As a landlord, one of the great programs that you'd benefit from is one called Onesite. Onesite is a management software system that allows you, as a apartment landlord, to screen your tenants within just a matter of seconds without the need for you to do anything on your own, essentially. What you need to do, as a landlord, is to have your potential renter fill out a paper application, then you would transfer the information from that application to the computer software system, Onesite. With the click of a button, Onesite will search through loads of information about that prospective tenant in a matter of seconds. Onesite will tell you whether they have had any run-ins with the law, owe any money on school loans, have ever been evicted from an apartment community within the last 10 years, have a criminal background, check their credit score, and even tell you if the cost of your apartments are too much for them to afford. The system will generate a Pass, Pass With Conditions, or Fail result that allows you to determine how much of a security deposit to charge them, or if you'd like to deny their application to rent one of your apartments.

One of the other advantages of using a software management system such as Onesite is that all of the information you input into the computer is stored in that residents future apartments' account, and then accessible through their stay at your community. This makes it easy for future apartment communities to screen this same renter based on the information you've provided into the system while they stayed at your community.

With the availability of Onesite, all apartment communities are able to quickly, and easily screen renters before they move in, ensuring that your rent is paid on-time (in most cases), and that the renter is an ideal candidate for living at your community. While there are some issues that can not be controlled, Onesite has certainly helped many communities do a quick background check prior to renting their apartments.